You look hot today.

Collecting flowers in #NapaValley #California #winery #napa #flowers #vineyards (at V. Sattui Winery, Napa Valley)

Collecting flowers in #NapaValley #California #winery #napa #flowers #vineyards (at V. Sattui Winery, Napa Valley)

artandspirituality:

In Islam it’s forbidden (perhaps more like impossible) to depict God by name or icon, so they just draw its essence directly, and make entire buildings in omage to the structure, beauty, and intricacy of God.

artandspirituality:

In Islam it’s forbidden (perhaps more like impossible) to depict God by name or icon, so they just draw its essence directly, and make entire buildings in omage to the structure, beauty, and intricacy of God.

killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?
Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.
Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.
Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 
And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)
So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 
This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 
I hope this made sense.

“yeah but they don’t have to be mexican, they could be cuban or spanish or brazilian, pls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”
an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason 
quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.
rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this
Zoom Info
killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?
Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.
Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.
Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 
And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)
So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 
This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 
I hope this made sense.

“yeah but they don’t have to be mexican, they could be cuban or spanish or brazilian, pls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”
an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason 
quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.
rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this
Zoom Info
killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?
Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.
Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.
Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 
And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)
So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 
This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 
I hope this made sense.

“yeah but they don’t have to be mexican, they could be cuban or spanish or brazilian, pls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”
an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason 
quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.
rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this
Zoom Info
killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?
Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.
Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.
Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 
And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)
So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 
This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 
I hope this made sense.

“yeah but they don’t have to be mexican, they could be cuban or spanish or brazilian, pls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”
an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason 
quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.
rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this
Zoom Info
killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?
Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.
Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.
Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 
And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)
So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 
This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 
I hope this made sense.

“yeah but they don’t have to be mexican, they could be cuban or spanish or brazilian, pls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”
an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason 
quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.
rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this
Zoom Info
killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?
Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.
Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.
Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 
And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)
So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 
This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 
I hope this made sense.

“yeah but they don’t have to be mexican, they could be cuban or spanish or brazilian, pls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”
an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason 
quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.
rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this
Zoom Info

killbenedictcumberbatch:

halloweevee:

halloweevee:

Ok guys can we have a chat about coding?

Coding is when characteristics of certain people/groups are applied to entities in media, oftentimes nonhuman characters. This is often a sort of subtle allegory to make a point or present a counterpart in a fantasy setting. Sometimes it takes the form of “monster culture,” where these stereotypical characteristics are applied to villains to demonize certain groups (you see this a lot with villains who take on stereotypical traits of marginalized groups such as LGBT people, or Jewish people for example). Sometimes it’s simply allegory.

Let’s look at these images as examples. Garnet is an alien with brown skin, an afro, and voiced by black english singer Estelle. So, it’s clear to see she’s coded as a black woman in spite of being an alien. The picture next to that is from the PBS kids show Arthur, portraying two characters in Senegal. They’re clearly animals, but they’re also Senegalese, so it can be inferred they’re coded as black Africans. They are relatives of another character on the show, The Brain, who is a bear. But in the show, he has family in Africa, and celebrates kwanzaa. It can be inferred he’s black as well.

Then Sagwa. This is about a family of siamese cats who lives in China sometime around the era of the Qing dynasty (I believe). They work for a magistrate and make calligraphy with their tails. They’re cats, but are coded by their environment and characterization as being Chinese. 

And the list goes on (The Between the Lions lions being African, Rosita and Quetzal being Mexican, etc)

So there’s a problem when you see a character like Garnet and go “she’s not black, she’s a gem!” Sure, in a literal sense. But she’s clearly CODED as a black woman. 

This ALSO plays into why you can’t arbitrarily assign certain coding to certain things and not take context and connotations into account. 

I hope this made sense.

yeah but they don’t have to be mexicanthey could be cuban or spanish or brazilianpls don’t catagorize all of the hispanics to just mexican.”

an understadable issue but!! i say mexican specifically for a reason

quetzal is named after the Aztec deity quetzalcoatl and has been referred to as having mexican coding on other sites such as the show’s wikipedia page. and if memory serves the show’s two main human characters are also canonically mexican.

rosita is much more clear cut, specifically stated in sesame street canon to be a monster who comes from mexico. 

thank u for this

yogipeach:

How Yoga Works + 101 Benefits  
Love Yourself Without Worrying About Your Body Size 
DIY Yoga Mat Cleaner, For Every Kind of Yogi!  
How to get through your yoga challenge? 
Poses, How to:
Downward Facing Dog
Upward Facing Dog   
Upward-Facing Open Angle Pose
Gate Pose
Lifted gate pose
Revolved Wide Legged Standing Forward Fold
Camel one legged pose
Seated wide angle forward fold
Half Standing Split
High lunge twisted
Funky Dolphin pose
One Handed Tiger Pose
One legged big toe bow pose
Extended Warrior Pose
Deep forward fold (Padahastasana) Standing Forward Bend Pose
Side plank with tree pose.
Wild Thing Pose 
Standing Mermaid Pose! 
Chair/Revolved Chair & Chair One Leg Pose
Guides/ Sequence
Beginners: Where to start?
Warm Up for Beginners   
Flexibility guide for Beginners
Sequence for back flexibility/ pain
Tips And Sequence For PMS
5 Sequences That Your Digestive System Will Love!
Release Those Hamstrings 
Guide for Confidence & Strength  
Yoga for when you feel sick or tired  
Guide for Tight Hips
Others:
Yogis Stereotyped!
It’s all about Namaste!

yogipeach:

Poses, How to:

Guides/ Sequence

Others:

Yogis Stereotyped!

It’s all about Namaste!

magnacarterholygrail:

magnacarterholygrail:

Had to get this one out before Halloween! 
YOU SHOULD BE SCAREDhalloween, horror, and just unsettling songs by people of colorpresented by magnacarterholygrail
DOWNLOAD IT HERE! [link updated 6/12/14]
TRACKLIST:

1. Vampire in Brooklyn Intro2. Melanie Fiona - Bones3. Michael Jackson - Thriller4. The Notorious B.I.G./Tae K - Who Shot Ya (Matlock Remix)5. Cee Lo Green - Bodies6. Kanye West ft. Jay-Z, Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj, & Bon Iver - Monster7. MellowHype ft. Earl Sweatshirt and Wolf Haley - Chordaroy8. Jimi Hendrix - Voodoo Chile Blues9. Nina Simone - I Put a Spell on You10. Flying Lotus - Tiny Tortures11. Jay-Z - Lucifer12. Kanye West ft Mr. Hudson - Paranoid13. Jay Electronica - Voodoo Man14. Rihanna - Disturbia15. Michael Jackson - Smooth Criminal16. Gnarls Barkley - Open Book17. Jay-Z & Kanye West ft. Frank Ocean - No Church In The Wild18. Andre 3000 ft. Kelis - Dracula’s Wedding19. Kid Cudi ft. Ratatat - Alive (Nightmare)20. Rockwell - Somebody’s Watching Me21. Gnarls Barkley - The Boogie Monster22. Gil Scott-Heron - Me and The Devil23. Ray Parker Jr. - Ghostbusters24. Michael Jackson - Threatened25. Kanye West - Dark Fantasy26. Will Smith - A Nightmare on My Street27. Harry Belafonte - Zombie Jamboree28. Lupe Fiasco - Put You On Game

Enjoy, I love you!

it’s that time of year again.

magnacarterholygrail:

magnacarterholygrail:

Had to get this one out before Halloween! 

YOU SHOULD BE SCARED
halloween, horror, and just unsettling songs by people of color
presented by magnacarterholygrail

DOWNLOAD IT HERE! [link updated 6/12/14]

TRACKLIST:

1. Vampire in Brooklyn Intro
2. Melanie Fiona - Bones
3. Michael Jackson - Thriller
4. The Notorious B.I.G./Tae K - Who Shot Ya (Matlock Remix)
5. Cee Lo Green - Bodies
6. Kanye West ft. Jay-Z, Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj, & Bon Iver - Monster
7. MellowHype ft. Earl Sweatshirt and Wolf Haley - Chordaroy
8. Jimi Hendrix - Voodoo Chile Blues
9. Nina Simone - I Put a Spell on You
10. Flying Lotus - Tiny Tortures
11. Jay-Z - Lucifer
12. Kanye West ft Mr. Hudson - Paranoid
13. Jay Electronica - Voodoo Man
14. Rihanna - Disturbia
15. Michael Jackson - Smooth Criminal
16. Gnarls Barkley - Open Book
17. Jay-Z & Kanye West ft. Frank Ocean - No Church In The Wild
18. Andre 3000 ft. Kelis - Dracula’s Wedding
19. Kid Cudi ft. Ratatat - Alive (Nightmare)
20. Rockwell - Somebody’s Watching Me
21. Gnarls Barkley - The Boogie Monster
22. Gil Scott-Heron - Me and The Devil
23. Ray Parker Jr. - Ghostbusters
24. Michael Jackson - Threatened
25. Kanye West - Dark Fantasy
26. Will Smith - A Nightmare on My Street
27. Harry Belafonte - Zombie Jamboree
28. Lupe Fiasco - Put You On Game

Enjoy, I love you!

it’s that time of year again.